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By Tom Seest

Why Did China Block Access to YouTube and Google Search?

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If you’re a Go fan, you’ve probably been following the story of Google’s Alphago program’s recent victory over the world’s top Go player. But did you know that state media outlets in China have censored coverage of this story? The government of China blocks access to YouTube and Google search, which would allow the Chinese to view the Alphago program’s win.

What Are the Benefits Of Living a Healthy Lifestyle?

What Are the Benefits Of Living a Healthy Lifestyle?

Can Chinese State Media Outlets Restrict Coverage of Board Game Vs Google?

A state-run newspaper in China banned coverage of the board game vs Google, citing the game’s ties to “opium.” Opium was the target of Western powers during the 19th century, and some relics are preserved for tourists. After the newspaper published its article, shares of the country’s biggest game company dropped significantly. A Google spokesperson declined to comment on the issue.
The Chinese government says it is censoring online content, but it has not confirmed that any content is blocked. Google’s AlphaGo computer program was able to beat the world’s number one Go player in the first match. The game was broadcast in a hall where Chinese leaders are holding the World Internet Conference, which brings together global Internet companies. Despite the ban, many people in China were unable to watch the game live.

Can Chinese State Media Outlets Restrict Coverage of Board Game Vs Google?

Can Chinese State Media Outlets Restrict Coverage of Board Game Vs Google?

Can Alphago Outsmart the World’s Best Go Player?

Google’s AI AlphaGo has just beaten the world’s number one Go player, Ke Jie. The game lasted four hours and fifteen minutes, and AlphaGo was ahead from the start. The system favors moves that are almost guaranteed to win. That means that the computer player will most likely come out on top.
The game has many possible configurations, and teaching a computer to beat a Go player has long been the holy grail of artificial intelligence researchers. It was expected that AlphaGo would eventually beat Ke, but its victories came earlier than expected. Google is streaming the games live, but it is reportedly blocked in China because of censorship.
AlphaGo beats Ke Jie twice in as many days, taking an unassailable lead in the three-part series. The win for AlphaGo marks a watershed moment in the evolution of artificial intelligence. The AI may now surpass human champions in Go.
AlphaGo, a machine developed by Google’s artificial intelligence arm, has defeated the world’s number one Go player twice in a row. The software beat 19-year-old Ke Jie in a best-of-three match in Wuzhen, China. After the match, Ke Jie called AlphaGo a “Go god.” Its performance stunned the Go community and was heralded as a landmark for artificial intelligence.
The AlphaGo victory may also represent a marketing success for Alphabet. Although Google pulled out of mainland China seven years ago due to the country’s censorship requirements, the company is still expressing interest in the country’s vast market. China’s internet regulators hold an annual conference in Wuzhen.

Can Alphago Outsmart the World's Best Go Player?

Can Alphago Outsmart the World’s Best Go Player?

The Chinese government has imposed tight censorship on internet content since 2013, cracking down on political speech and instituting laws against spreading rumors. The government’s efforts have effectively stifled public discussion of current events. But Google’s sudden reversal caught them by surprise. Until this point, most Chinese Internet users were free to go about their online lives without worrying about the government’s restrictions. But Google’s announcement thrust the issue of censorship and cyberattacks into the public sphere.
In a statement, Google executive chairman Eric Schmidt argued that encryption could help the company penetrate China’s censorship policies. But Google’s efforts to gain access to social media sites in China suffered a major setback in March 2014 when Chinese authorities deleted prominent politically liberal accounts on WeChat. The Chinese government then announced regulations on the use of instant messaging tools like WeChat. WeChat, a Chinese-based social network with more than 750 million users, had become a platform for popular dissent.
The Chinese government is also blocking some websites and services owned by Google. These websites and services contain images, videos, and search terms that are considered a threat to social stability. Chinese officials are particularly sensitive to such material. They are also keen to block any news or information that could incite social unrest.
In 2010, Google discontinued its search engine in China and pulled its translation service, too. Since then, the company has been retreating from the country’s second-largest economy. However, a recent app named Tuber – backed by cybersecurity giant Qihoo 360 – allowed Chinese internet users to access foreign websites.
Chinese officials have many ways to monitor the content on the internet. According to Beijing News, the government employs two million people to read online posts and compile reports for “decision makers.” Private companies and state-owned companies hire “public opinion analysts” to monitor Internet content. The government also restricts media outlets’ coverage of politically sensitive topics. Recently, a popular liberal Guangdong magazine was censored and removed from online news.
Though genuine YouTube has been blocked in China for two years, pirate versions have been available to mainland internet users without special equipment. Researchers estimate that 95 percent of Internet users in China use mobile devices. The Android operating system is also widely used in China. Therefore, the new app should provide easy access to the service for the vast majority of internet users.
Google’s return to China would put the company in an intense political pressure cooker. The company’s 2010 exit caused a massive loss of face for the Chinese government. A return to China would put the company’s future in jeopardy.

Can Chinese Officials Deny Access to Google-Owned YouTube and Search?

Can Chinese Officials Deny Access to Google-Owned YouTube and Search?

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